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Earth News: THE COMMONS Part 7 Conclusions
In the past few weeks we have seen that the individual can take only small steps to protect the commons. The problem is a giant one and its solution can only be accomplished by governments, wise regulations, and unselfish international treaties. In other words, a political solution must be found. We must elect political leaders who will constructively lead us in establishing regulations and treaties that will save humanity from destroying our common land, air, and water. It is much easier to identify who are NOT such leaders than it is to identify who are. Lets look at the clues that reveal who should not be elected.



In the garden
It's the middle of July and It's so hot and dry. Cookouts, the pool, and vacation time are what come to mind, not a fall garden.  Pull everything that has made, prep the bed, and get ready for a fantastic time to garden.



Nothing Will Last Forever
In life, many things seem to be able to last forever. Technically speaking, yes; but in reality, the answer is “NO” because everything has its beginning; it must have its ending. Nothing in the world will last forever.



Disaster Prep Dave: Jump Starting Your Food Supply, Part II
   Last week we began a shopping list of groceries to get started with your food storage plan.  These are everyday items you can buy at any food market.  All the experts recommend storing food with which your body is already familiar.  In the event of a disaster, everyone’s system is under stress and introducing strange food into your diet will only serve to sideline you at a time when you need to be 100%.  
Don’t try to do this all at once.  Watch the sales, shop the bargains and buy what you know.  You can get the dehydrated meals if you like, and they will keep you alive, and they do look good stacked in your pantry, but I’m willing to wager that you’ve never tasted them.  




The Forester Herald: Things We Have Learned
Most of us, especially the ones living in the days of radio, before TV, remember listening to Paul Harvey. I’m sure he never saw or heard of Forester but as I read a letter he wrote home for his kids I could imagine he must have grown up a lot like us. What he wished for them is just about the same as things we learned to do at a young age and still remember today. Here are a few of mine.
I learned to make my bed when still a child,it was so much fun beating that old feather bed with the broom to make it fat and fluffy and so comfy to sleep on. If our car needed to be washed Daddy drove it into the creek where we could wash it and have fun wading and splashing in the water at the same time.
Some of us got a new bike but no one was given a new car when they turned sixteen,as they do a lot these days.
l don't ever recall getting a black eye but I did have a fight of sorts with a boy who was mistreating a friend who was smaller. I slapped him once and he cried and I felt bad about the whole thing. My baby sister did not sleep with me but I wished she could.
All the kids, big or little, walked up to town, to the show, and could do it safely in Forester's streets - day or night .We were not ashamed to be seen riding with Mom or Dad or have them visit school.




The Forester Herald: Things We Have Learned
Most of us, especially the ones living in the days of radio, before TV, remember listening to Paul Harvey. I’m sure he never saw or heard of Forester but as I read a letter he wrote home for his kids I could imagine he must have grown up a lot like us. What he wished for them is just about the same as things we learned to do at a young age and still remember today. Here are a few of mine.
I learned to make my bed when still a child,it was so much fun beating that old feather bed with the broom to make it fat and fluffy and so comfy to sleep on. If our car needed to be washed Daddy drove it into the creek where we could wash it and have fun wading and splashing in the water at the same time.
Some of us got a new bike but no one was given a new car when they turned sixteen,as they do a lot these days.
l don't ever recall getting a black eye but I did have a fight of sorts with a boy who was mistreating a friend who was smaller. I slapped him once and he cried and I felt bad about the whole thing. My baby sister did not sleep with me but I wished she could.
All the kids, big or little, walked up to town, to the show, and could do it safely in Forester's streets - day or night .We were not ashamed to be seen riding with Mom or Dad or have them visit school.




Arkansas House of Representatives
In February of this year, students and teachers experienced a frightening situation when a gun was found on campus at a school in Marion. Within minutes the school was in lockdown, students found a safe location, and police secured the building. No shots were fired and no one was hurt.
The quick reaction was set in motion when the principal activated the Rave Panic Button. This technology was developed after the 90th General Assembly passed the School Safety Act last year.
As many of us prepare to send our children back to school next month, we want to remind parents about this technology now available to every school in the state.
The Panic Button is a mobile app that allows authorized employees of schools and businesses to not only contact 911 when an emergency is taking place, but also to notify their co-workers of the incident simultaneously. The Panic Button also enhances first responders’ ability to aide during the emergency response by providing critical campus information to 911.




Lexi Weeks brought to tears by hometown’s support efforts
Just when her tears of joy upon vaulting to the U.S. Women’s Olympic track and field  team finally dried, Lexi Weeks’ hometown opened her tear ducts again.
Cabot is  the hometown of the University of Arkansas freshman pole vaulting Weeks twin sisters:  Tori, amazing in her own right as a NCAA Indoor All-American and SEC Indoor third-placer and SEC Outdoor runner-up. And Lexi, unbelievable as the rookie NCAA and SEC Indoor and Outdoor champion helping Coach Lance Harter’s Razorbacks win the NCAA Women’s Outdoor championship,  become U.S. Olympian qualifying for the third and final team vaulting spot at the U.S. Trials in Eugene, Ore.




Lexi Weeks brought to tears by hometown’s support efforts
Just when her tears of joy upon vaulting to the U.S. Women’s Olympic track and field  team finally dried, Lexi Weeks’ hometown opened her tear ducts again.
Cabot is  the hometown of the University of Arkansas freshman pole vaulting Weeks twin sisters:  Tori, amazing in her own right as a NCAA Indoor All-American and SEC Indoor third-placer and SEC Outdoor runner-up. And Lexi, unbelievable as the rookie NCAA and SEC Indoor and Outdoor champion helping Coach Lance Harter’s Razorbacks win the NCAA Women’s Outdoor championship,  become U.S. Olympian qualifying for the third and final team vaulting spot at the U.S. Trials in Eugene, Ore.




Sight visit at Forrester-Davis Memorial Park
A sight visit by Mike Sprague, Project Officer and State Trails Coordinator for the Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism, was held last week on Tuesday, at the Forrester-Davis Memorial Park where the former Waldron High School once stood. Earlier this year, the Waldron School Board transferred ownership of the property to the City for the development of a City Park. The City is the process of making an application to add several features to the Park.



State Capitol Week in Review
It’s always good to go back home. This summer, I’ll be returning to the small town in Northwest Arkansas where I grew up to reconnect with friends and family and to enjoy the memories of my youth. Growing up in Gravette has helped me to appreciate the value of the close-knit community that small towns often produce.
When I return home, I am reminded of the importance of continuing to invest in these smaller communities that may sometimes be overlooked. One of the best ways we can invest in our state’s small communities is to work hard to provide the best educational resources, particularly by ensuring that these communities have access to broadband Internet. Over the past 10 years access to the Internet has transitioned from a luxury to a necessity, and communities that lack access are at risk of falling further behind.
Forty years ago, the world was very different. Growing up, I recall taking trips to the library and sifting through card catalogs to find information for my school projects, but today, most students research information online or through a digital library catalog. Methods of education are constantly evolving along with the development of new technology. Technological advancements have provided students, teachers and communities with vast resources for research and study. The Internet provides massive amounts of information at the click of a button.
But for students living in rural areas, online research may not be so simple. Much of the time, small towns in rural Arkansas have difficulty accessing online information simply due to a lack of broadband connectivity.
As Governor, it is my objective to eliminate hurdles that limit opportunity and affect the quality of our schools and communities.




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LOCAL HEADLINES
Earth News: THE COMMONS Part 7 Conclusions
In the garden
Nothing Will Last Forever
Razorbacks pole vaulter Lexi Weeks of Cabot headed for Olympic Trials
Lady Bulldogs capture 7-4A District Track Championship Title